Chevy Facing Yet Another Round of Recalls

Chevy Facing Yet Another Round of Recalls

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Chevy is facing another round of recalls as GM announces a 289k Chevy Impala recall for faulty airbag sensor system.

The passenger sensory system is able to detect if a person is seated in the passenger seat and activate the airbag release should an accident occur. The 2009-2010 Chevy Impala models are in question as GM said the sensory system is disabled if the seat frame makes contact with the wires of the unit that contacts the sensors. Vehicle owners will be notified and dealers are committed to fixing the damaged wires for free.

This latest announcement comes as no surprise. Clearly there was a shift in focus during the first decade of the millennium with GM and the safety of consumers was not the priority. In 2003, GM recalled 1.8 million vehicles for faulty windshield wipers. In 2004, GM recalled 3.7 million vehicles for tailgates that broke when people stood on them. It wasn’t until February 2014 when GM began rolling out recalls for faulty ignition switches installed in cars from 1997-2011 that a real pattern of negligence emerged. First it was 1.37 million for the ignition switch recall, then a new ignition switch flaw expanded the recall to 2.6 million. 3 months later, a recall for faulty brake light wiring and front seat belts in pre-2010 models brought the world-wide total to 13.6 million. By June of 2014, GM had recalled nearly 30 million vehicles worldwide for vehicles manufactured a decade before the announcement. This pattern was noticed by the media, the federal government, safety regulators, and most noticeably, attorneys on behalf of clients that were injured as a result of GM’s negligence in their safety and engineering practices.

The Cooper Firm was proud to represent one of the first families willing to go the distance and prove GM was at fault for the wrongful death of their daughter, Brooke Melton. If you, or someone you know, have been injured in an accident as a result of the negligence by an auto manufacturer, we would be proud to represent you as well.

Contact us today for a complimentary case consultation

Shocking- Another secret Chevy Volt investigation

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Shocking- Another secret Chevy Volt investigation

There may be more irony with the Chevy Volt electric car than ever before. A driver from California made a complaint to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration that was literally shocking. As the driver was shifting gears they received a significant electric shock from the gear shifter. When the incident occurred, the driver was able to remove their hand before the muscles contracted which could have resulted in further electrocution. The driver suffered significant electrical shock injury with pain, shock, soreness, numbness, and tingling sensation.

When reported to GM, the driver was instructed to call 911 so that they could disconnect the power. GM agreed to buy back this vehicle which had other issues, such as it turning itself on and off. Though the driver isn’t ready or may not sue GM, they do want for other owners to be informed of the incident. So far, GM has not honored the driver’s request.

This is not the first time that an investigation or problem with the Chevy Volt has been kept quiet. The last investigation was started when an incident was reported of a Chevy Volt catching on fire from a battery coolant leak. After about two months of testing and an official investigation no defects in the Volt were found. The investigation was not released to the public until about five months after all the tests and analysis had been done.

GM did agree to conduct a “free-of-charge customer satisfaction campaign,” which was an unregulated recall on 14,735 vehicles manufactured before December 21, 2011. The campaign helped strengthen the structure of the vehicle where the battery intrusion occurred, adding a battery HV coolant loss sensor, control system software that alerts the driver and prevents recharging of the HV battery, and a tamper-proofing device that prevents consumers from adding coolant.

The issue of the electric shock with the Volt is serious. The National Fire Protection Association and GM partnered to train a responder how to safely de-power a Volt and fight battery fire. It takes a lot of direct current voltage to produce that much of a shock. It will be interesting to see how GM handles this situation and if there will be more incidents.

Source: Safety Research and Strategies, “Another Secret Chevy Volt Investigation?” March 5, 2013.


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