How Do I Know If My Car Has A Recall?

How Do I Know If My Car Has A Recall?

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How Do I Know If My Car Has A Recall?

There’s a handful of ways to know if your car has a recall. The first, and really the most important, way that you need to know, is you can look at a government website called safercar.gov and they will tell you clearly if there is a recall that applies to your vehicle. They’ll also tell you if it’s a safety related recall.

Most people buy used cars and most people don’t know that when you buy a used car, they can sell you the car without disclosing to you that a recall service hasn’t been performed.

Sometimes you’ll get recall notices in the mail, but don’t count on this. Don’t count on being able to receive all this information effectively through the mail because a manufacturer may or may not know about you. That’s especially true if you’ve bought a used car.

Last, and the most important thing people need to realize about recalls, is just because you don’t have a recall on your vehicle, doesn’t mean that it’s safe. If you are injured by something in your vehicle and you don’t see a recall posted online, that doesn’t mean what happened was right.

When you come to a firm like us and we take your case, the recalls that happen, happen as a result of the work of this firm. Make sure you know what is going on with your vehicle and make sure you know whether a recall has been performed or whether you need to go take care of one.

Why Your New Car Could Need A New Airbag

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Air Bag Defect Attorney - The Cooper Firm

Why Your New Car Could Need a New Airbag

Although the widespread Takata airbag recall began in 2015, new cars are still being sold with the faulty airbags installed.

A recent report from the U.S. Senate Commerce committee showed that 4 automakers: Toyota, Volkswagen, Fiat Chrysler, and Mitsubishi have confirmed selling new vehicles containing the Takata manufactured defective airbags.

AlthoughTakata is not permitted to contract new business, Federal regulators are allowing automakers to sell new cars with the previously installed Takata airbag as long as they commit to replacing by 2018. So what does that mean for you?

First and foremost, ask your authorized dealership before you buy. They will either know if you car contains a recalled airbag, or can find out. From there you can determine how you want to proceed with the purchase based on the information at hand.

Second, if you have purchased a new car recently by these 4 manufacturers, or if you want to know if your car is part of any recall, visit The National Highway Transportation Safety ‘s website and enter your VIN (vehicle identification number). If your car has an outstanding recall, contact your dealership immediately to schedule a repair.

And as always, if you or any you know has been injured in a car accident due to a faulty airbag, please contact us today for a complimentary case consultation.

Source: www.Cars.com

 

Honda: Passing The Buck & The Blame to Takata

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Air Bag Defect Attorney - The Cooper Firm

Honda is passing the buck and the blame to Takata for airbag recall crisis.

Despite setting the industry standard for best practices with regards to regulating suppliers, Honda blames Takata for supplying faulty airbags.

The number of vehicles involved in the Takata airbag crisis is staggering. It now involves over 20 automobile manufacturers and nearly 51 million vehicles worldwide. Honda alone has recalled about 8 million vehicles in the US.  These faulty airbags are deploying at such high pressure that the inflator may rupture causing metal parts to burst through the airbag like shrapnel after an explosion. Designed to provide an additional layer of safety, these airbags can do more harm than good.  And Honda says it’s not their fault.

AirbagCrash-Quote

Honda’s founding principle of “Best Practices, Best Processes, and Best Performance” has been the driver for excellence in a highly competitive market. They encourage their employees to question and re-examine every improvement or idea in an effort to seek perfection.  For a company so intent on creating a culture of hands-on investigation, it’s hard to understand how they can claim the dangerous airbags installed in nearly 8 million US Honda vehicles over more than a decade was the sole fault of the supplier. If Honda is successful in avoiding the majority of the blame for the faulty airbags, they could also avoid the majority of the financial penalties and responsibilities for replacement, not to mention the numerous inevitable lawsuits.

With a recall vehicle list that is growing by the millions, it doesn’t look like the end is nearing.

The Cooper Firm encourages everyone to visit the NHTSA recall website to see if their vehicle is included in the Takata airbag recall and contact their nearest dealership immediately to schedule the replacement.

If you or someone you know has been injured due to a faulty airbag, please contact The Cooper Firm for a complimentary case consultation.

For more detailed information about the Honda and Takata blame game, visit  The Safety Research Blog.

Honda Recalls 2016 CR-Vs for Exploding Airbags

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Air Bag Defect Attorney - The Cooper Firm

Honda Recalls 2016 CR-Vs for Exploding Airbags

Honda Motor Co. is recalling some of its 2016 CR-V models for a new Takata airbag defect. The CR-V is the top selling crossover/SUV in the United States.

The potentially deadly defect, involves a manufacturing defect in the metal housing surrounding the driver’s airbag inflator. The inflator could rupture during an accident and shoot out metal fragments. The fragments could strike the driver or other passengers causing serious injuries or death. Honda posted the recall on its company website. The defect was originally discovered in Takata’s factory in Monclova, Mexico.

Takata has been under investigation by NHTSA for its rupturing airbags which have killed seven people in the United States and injured hundreds. The cause of the defect has yet to be identified. There are 12 affected automakers and a total of 23 million defective inflators that cover 19 million vehicles. NHTSA says less than a quarter of the vehicles have been repaired.

Honda’s newest recall affects 515 vehicles. Only 30 of those vehicles have been sold. The unsold vehicles will be put under a stop-sale until the needed repairs are complete. There are no reported injuries, warranty claims or crashes related to the defect.

Takata’s initial investigation after being in contact with Honda is that the defect may be related to structural failure in the inflator casing due to a manufacturing flaw. Ammonium nitrate has been contributed to Takata’s larger recall of explosive airbags.

If you or someone you know has been injured as a result of a defective product, contact our law offices today for a free consultation.

NHTSA imposes $200 million civil penalty to Takata

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Marietta product defect attorney

NHTSA imposes $200 million civil penalty to Takata

The Department of Transportation’s National Highway Safety Administration (NHTSA) issued two orders regarding Takata airbags in order to protect those driving on the roads. The orders impose a $200 million civil penalty to Takata for violation of the Motor Vehicle Safety Act. This is the largest civil penalty in NHTSA’s history. NHTSA will also be using its authority to accelerate recall repairs for the first time. The agency will prioritize the recalls so that the greatest safety risks are addressed first and then deadlines will be set for all future recalls.

The consent orders come after Takata sold and manufactured defective products which have injured hundreds of people and caused at least 7 deaths. Takata initially refused to acknowledge the defect and failed to provide all known data regarding the defect to NHTSA. The delay then led to the most complex safety recall in U.S. history, according to NHTSA’s press release. The consent order will require Takata to phase out all inflators that use phase-stabilized ammonium nitrate propellant, which is attributed to being the factor which causes explosive ruptures.

As part of the consent order, Takata admitted that it was aware of the defect and failed to recall the products in a timely matter, which in turn violated the Motor Vehicle Safety Act. Takata also admitted that it failed to submit all of its data or inaccurately submitted its data as early as 2009. As a result, Takata will have an independent monitor selected by NHTSA to oversee and track its compliance with consent order and the phase out schedule.

Along with the Consent Order, NHTSA issued a Coordinated Remedy Order which gives the agency authority to accelerate the safety defect repairs. The Coordinated Remedy Order was also issued to the 12 automakers with Takata parts. The order will organize and prioritize the recall and remedy programs based on risk. Along with the Coordinate Remedy Order, automakers will need to have replacement parts for the highest-risk inflators by June 2016 as well as provide final remedies for all vehicles by the end of 2019.

If you or someone you know has been injured as a result of one of these defective airbags, contact our law offices today for a free consultation.

Takata Air Bag Recall Potentially Expanding to 7 more Automakers

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Air Bag Defect Attorney - The Cooper Firm

Takata Air Bag Recall Potentially Expanding to 7 more Automakers

Seven more automakers could be facing large recalls due to the fact they use airbag inflators manufactured by Takata.

As of this year, there have been nearly 23.4 million Takata airbag inflators recalled on 19.2 million vehicles in the United States due to the fact the inflators can explode with too much force spewing metal shrapnel into occupants. This defect has led to at least eight known deaths. The recalled vehicles fall under 11 different automakers, but that number could be growing very soon. The current recall affects BMW, Daimler Trucks, Fiat Chrysler, Ford, General Motors, Honda, Mazda, Mitsubishi, Nissan, Subaru and Toyota.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) has now sent out investigation letters to Mercedes-Benz, Jaguar-Land Rover, Suzuki, Telsa, Volvo Trucks, Volkswagen and Spartan Motors to determine if any of the companies have vehicles with Takata Corp. inflators. If so, the recall could expand to these automakers as well. The letter requested that the seven companies identify which of their models have airbag inflators from Takata that use ammonium nitrate as the propellant.  NHTSA will be holding a public meeting on October 22 in Washington D.C. to discuss the Takata investigation and if the agency needs to take over in order to speed up the repairs. Unfortunately, only 4.4 million of the 23.4 million recalled airbags have been replaced due to lack of replacement parts and lagging from manufacturers.

NHTSA has already started investigating Volkswagen due to a crash in June with a 2015 VW Tiguan where the left side airbag inflated with too much force. This is particularly interesting considering that Takata had stated the issue was limited to older models in front and passenger air bags.

Our hope is that NHTSA will fully investigate and take action to make sure all of these vehicles get replacements quickly and that all defective inflators are recalled.

If you or someone you know has been injured as a result of a defective airbag, contact our law offices today for a free consultation.

Auto Safety Technology Becomes Large Factor in Customer Satisfaction

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Vehicle Safety Technology Attorney - The Cooper Firm

Auto Safety Technology Becomes Large Factor in Customer Satisfaction

A recent study revealed that as cars move towards becoming autonomous, consumers are valuing auto safety technology more and more in customer satisfaction.

According to the J.D. Power’s annual “APEAL” survey, blind spot detection, parking assist and lane departure warnings are among the most popular safety features that consumers want on vehicles. The study itself looks at car buyers and their impressions of vehicle performance, execution and layout. With all the recalls and safety defects in the news, consumers want to feel like they can trust the automaker and the vehicle that they are driving.

The study, which is now in its 20th year, compared 77 attributes for vehicles and combined them into an overall APEAL rating. Vehicles with blind-spot monitoring and warning systems scored 38 points higher than those vehicles without. Not only do consumers prefer vehicles with these features, but they are also willing to pay more for them. To read more about the APEAL study, you can visit J.D. Power’s website here.

In the past year, there have been recalls for defective GM  ignition switches linked to 124 deaths, exploding Takata airbags linked to at least 8 deaths and hundreds of injures, and dozens of other recalls affecting almost all automakers and millions of vehicles. During the same time frame, Google was working on developing self-driving vehicles along with a few other automakers who are investing billions into the research and development.

Although we see the benefits of auto safety technology, our concern is that these vehicles may develop flaws and defects like simple technology such as airbags and ignition switches have. With any new technology, defects can happen resulting in accidents. Hopefully automakers will take time and effort to ensure as development and manufacturing occurs that every glitch is taken care of before the vehicle hits the road.

Second Company Investigated for Airbag Inflator Defects

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Air Bag Defect Attorney - The Cooper Firm

Second Company Investigated for Airbag Inflator Defects          

Exploding airbags could be an issue for more than just one manufacturer.  The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) is investigating inflators made by ARC Automotive Inc., for improper deployment.

The investigation was opened just weeks after Takata, a Japanese airbag manufacturer, recalled 33.8 million defective inflators. At least eight people died and a hundred were injured due to the inflators shooting off and sending shrapnel into occupants. It is the largest recall in American history, to date.

The ARC inflators being investigated were put into nearly 420,000 older Fiat Chrysler Town and Country minivans and 70,000 Kia Optima midsize sedans. NHTSA received its first complaint this December regarding a 2009 incident, where a 2002 Chrysler minivan driver’s side airbag inflated. After Kia notified the agency of another incident involving a lawsuit, NHTSA opened the investigation. Although the agency says these are the only two incidents reported, the number of incidents may be much higher considering the vehicles affected are older.

The investigation will help determine how many ARC inflators are on the road, and what other vehicles may be affected. ARC manufactured the inflators for Delphi Corp. who sold the airbags to automakers. Delphi said that it will respond to NHTSA’s inquiries. ARC uses ammonium nitrate propellant to fill their airbags. This is the same product that has cause Takata’s airbags to rupture. This propellant can become unstable over time and explode, especially when exposed to high humidity.

Three-quarters of the Takata airbags that have ruptured came from Florida. NHTSA is urging all consumers with affected vehicles in Florida to have their vehicles fixed as soon as possible.

If you or someone you know has been injured as a result of a defective airbag or vehicle, contact our law offices today for a free consultation.

Honda confirms 8th fatality from defective Takata airbags

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Air Bag Defect Attorney - The Cooper Firm

Honda confirms 8th fatality from defective Takata airbags

Honda confirmed the eighth death from a ruptured Takata airbag inflator in Los Angeles, California after an investigation.

Last September, Jewel Brangman was driving a 2001 Honda Civic rental when she was involved in a car accident. The investigation shows that her fatality was likely the result of the defective airbag. The vehicle was under a 2009 recall, 2013 recall, and two separate recall campaigns in 2014. There were four notices on the 2009 recall and one notice on the 2013 recall mailed to the owner of the vehicle, but none of the repairs had been made.

Mark Rosekind, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administrator’s (NHTSA) administrator, shared that “The fact this was a rental vehicle that had not been remedied is more evidence for why we are seeking authority to prohibit the sale or rental of any vehicle with an open safety recall.”

This is the eighth fatality connected to the defective Takata airbags. Of the eight, seven have been in the United States. There are now currently about 34 million airbag inflators recalled by eleven different automakers. Due to the fact that the recall covers older vehicles, many vehicles have changed owners and automakers are struggling to notify new owners of the recall. NHTSA is also trying to speed up the pace of the repairs, but Takata does not have enough inflators to supply automakers.

If you or someone you know has been injured as a result of a defective airbag or vehicle, contact our law offices today for a free consultation.

Source: Automotive News

Honda confirms another death due to Takata airbag

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Air Bag Defect Attorney - The Cooper Firm

Honda confirms another death due to Takata airbag

Honda has confirmed another death as a result of the rupture of a defective Takata airbag. This is the seventh death worldwide associated with the defective Takata airbags. The airbags have potential to explode too forcefully sending out metal or plastic shrapnel into occupants. Honda recently reported that Kylan Langlinais died after her airbag ruptured in her 2005 Honda Civic during a crash on April 5. The accident occurred in Lafayette, Louisiana. A recall letter for the airbags was mailed to Langlinais three days before the car accident.

In the United States, there have been five reported deaths related to the defect and one oversees. All of the deaths were in Honda vehicles. Honda recently released its financial statements which showed that the recall has cost them $363 million. The defect has resulted in over 33.8 million vehicle parts being recalled under 11 automakers. The recall was expanded after an agreement and investigation from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

If you or someone you know has been injured as a result of a defective airbag or vehicle, contact our law offices today for a free consultation.

Source: ABC, Rueters


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