Motorcyclist Sues GM Over Self-Driving Crash

Motorcyclist Sues GM Over Self-Driving Crash

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self-driving vehicle interior

Motorcyclist Sues GM Over Self-Driving Crash

A San Francisco motorcyclist is suing General Motors after he was struck on the highway by one of their self-driving vehicles, the GM Cruise AV.

Self-driving vehicles, or autonomous vehicles, have been part of the automobile conversation for several years. We’ve seen prototypes from Google, Tesla and General Motors, and even seen reports of Uber testing out special models. Although fully autonomous vehicles are still a futuristic concept, semi-autonomous vehicles are in use and one manufacturer is already under fire.

The victim was on a motorcycle following behind the self-driving GM Cruise AV when a collision occurred during an unexpected lane change. The victim claimed the self-driving vehicle had begun to change lanes and then abruptly returned, colliding with his motorcycle. The driver of the GM Cruise AV confirmed the vehicle was operating under the auto-pilot mode.

In the Fall of 2017, a Federal investigation determined that the design of Tesla’s semi-autonomous vehicle, Tesla Model S, was a contributing factor in a 2016 fatal crash. Investigators stated that the self-driving system allowed the driver to rely too heavily on the car’s automation.

Representatives for Tesla have long taken the stance that when operating their vehicles in the auto-pilot mode, the ‘responsibility remains with the driver’ to safely operate the vehicle and to follow and obey traffic laws. It is not an opportunity to ‘check out’. No statement has been made by GM as of now.

Follow our blog for more updates regarding safety concerns for semi and fully autonomous vehicles as they are introduced to the public.

Source: ABC News

Tesla Releases Most Advanced Autonomous Driving Feature

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Vehicle Safety Technology Attorney - The Cooper Firm

Tesla Releases Most Advanced Autonomous Driving Feature

Tesla Motors Inc. released a new and advanced set of autonomous driving vehicle features which just fall short of making its vehicles fully driverless.

Due to safety and regulatory issues, the update requires the driver to grab the steering wheel every ten seconds or so to avoid having the vehicle slow down. The new software update allows the vehicles to drive hands- and feet-free in stop-and-go traffic and on the highway. The vehicle can also park itself. The features became available for 50,000 newer Model S vehicles across the world with a simple software download. Only vehicles that were built in the past 12 months will work with the new software. The newer models have the complex sensors and cameras needed for autonomous driving features.

The demand for driverless vehicles is high and consumers want more and more gadgets on their vehicles. Unfortunately, automakers are battling with state regulators and the lack of safety regulations in place for vehicles of this nature. Telsa’s Chief Executive Elon Musk has said that Telsa is being extremely cautious during the early stages. Currently, California’s Department of Motor Vehicles requires special licensing for autonomous vehicles. Because of Tesla’s check-in feature, where the driver must touch the steering wheel, the vehicles’ upgrade does not fall under the stage where it would need special licensing.

Musk has tested the vehicle himself for several months, and said that it works best with a car in front of it and clear distinct lane lines. In three years, Musk feels that Tesla will be capable of building a vehicle that will take you to a destination without touching anything. Currently, the driver can set the speed using cruise control and the car will stay in the center of the lane keeping a safe distance in between itself and other vehicles. By hitting the lane change signal, the car will check to see if there is a vehicle in the blind zone and will then switch lanes and accelerate to an appropriate speed. Most advanced is the vehicle’s ability to understand dangerous curves and things such as exits ramps where it needs to slow down.

This is only the beginning for driverless vehicles. As more safety regulations are passed, automakers will roll out more technology. Many automakers in development are already claiming to take full liability for accidents caused by its vehicles in order to help speed up regulations.


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